Regierungsmitteilungen

legal year open

The President, H.E. Dr Hage Geingob (centre front) flanked by the Deputy Chief Justice, Hon Mr Justice Petrus Damaseb (centre left) and the Chief Justice of Namibia, Hon Mr Justice Peter Shivute (centre right) at Wednesday’s opening of the Legal Year. Next to Justice Shivute stands the Permanent Secretary in the Office of the Judiciary, Ms Rolanda van Wyk. Robed in black or red are all the judges of the higher courts.

 Legal Year opening brings 2016 judicial achievements into perspective

 

Please, click here for the: STATEMENT BY HIS EXCELLENCY DR HAGE G. GEINGOB, PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA AT THE OPENING OF THE 2017 LEGAL YEAR, February 8, 2017

Namibia Economist, 09 February 2017

The Legal Year opening, hosted at the Supreme Court by the now-independent Office of the Judiciary, was attended by senior legal practitioners, officers of the various courts, officials from the Ministry of Justice, representatives from legal bodies and by the esteemed judges of both the High Court and the Supreme Court.

In the main address, Justice Shivute gave a wide ranging overview of the judicial progress of the past year.

The most impressive improvement was achieved in the Magistrate Courts where the Chief Justice said more than 25,700 criminal cases were heard in the first semester only. More than 12,700 of these were finalised.

“Magistrates across the country participated in various courses, including criminal procedure and wildlife protection. Training in wildlife protection has become very important in the light of the disturbing trend of wanton poaching of our country’s endangered wildlife species” said Shivute to illustrate the need for the justice system to remain abreast of evolving crimes.

At the beginning of 2016, the Office of the Judiciary was made an independent judicial institution. In the regard Shivute said “the first order of business was to bring all constituent parts of the Office of the Judiciary under a unified command. Great strides have been made to that end but more still needs to be done, especially as far as legislative reform is concerned. Important pieces of legislation are still out of harmony with the changes brought about by the Namibian Constitution Third Amendment Act and the Judiciary Act of 2015. A notable example is the governance of the magistracy. The appointment, discipline and remuneration of the magistracy must be harmonised, not only in tandem with the Namibian Constitution Third Amendment Act, but also with the twin principles of the independence of the Judiciary and separation of powers.”  Click here to read more.....

APRM

On 28 January 2017, President Dr Hage Geingob signed the accession Memorandum of Understanding of the Africa Peer Review Mechanism (APRM).

Namibia joins 35 other African Union (AU) Member States on the APRM.

The APRM was established in 2003 by the New Partnership (NEPAD) for African Heads of State and Government Implementation Committee, (HSGIC) to monitor governance performance amongst Member States. The APRM is a self-monitoring instrument of the AU and its membership is voluntary.

#28thAUsummit

President Geingob calls for rededication in New Year's message

New Year Message Video
President Hage Geingob says the tough economic outlook will require Namibians to draw on the experiences and lessons learned during 2016 and to engage in difficult debates over limited resources and competing priorities. It is with this message that President Geingob wants Namibians to enter the new year and adopt a determined outlook towards the future.

Please click on the photo to listen to the President's abbreviated New Year Message on NBC....

Please click here to read the President's full New Year Message 2017....

harambee 1024x683

WINDHOEK, 13 December 2016 – President Hage Geingob and Cabinet ministers pictured during the Harambee 2016 Review press conference held at State House on Tuesday. (Photo by: Joseph Nekaya) NAMPA

Speaking at a media conference on the mid-term performance of the Harambee Prosperity Plan (HPP), President Dr Hage Geingob said, “Contrary to the pessimists who predicted a downgrading in our international investment rating and continue to suggest that Namibia is broke, the Namibian house remains politically and economically stable. Our social bonds continue to strengthen and the process of moulding the nation should never be disrupted by ethnic differences”.  The President further highlighted the important role that Namibians from all backgrounds have played by supporting and taking ownership of HPP. “Locally, Namibians from all walks of life are rallying behind the Harambee Prosperity Plan, in the spirit of one Namibia, one Nation,” President Geingob added. He showed satisfaction about what had been achieved during the short period of the HPP also on the international level, “Internationally, people have taken note of the Namibia story and are in awe of what we have achieved in a relatively short period” .

HPP MID TERM PERFORMANCE REVIEW, BY HIS EXCELLENCY DR. HAGE G GEINGOB, PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA, 13 DECEMBER 2016

(...) "As you are aware, we have declared 2016, the year of implementation. The main focus of this press conference is to provide feedback to the Nation on some of the key undertakings of Government, during the year under review. It is also to underscore Government’s commitment to transparency and accountability.

In terms of our supreme law, the President is obliged to account to Parliament only once a year, during the State of the Nation Address. We believe this is insufficient and have purposefully created opportunities to account to the Nation throughout the year. This is yet another such opportunity." Please click here to continue reading...

Don’t lecture us about human rights – Geingob

New Era, December 6, 2016, by Toivo Ndjebela

Geingob castroPresident Hage Geingob suggested it is hypocritical of Western nations that supported the repressive apartheid South African regime to now accuse late Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro of human rights violations when such nations themselves perpetuated similar crimes in southern Africa.

The apartheid minority regime committed many atrocities and human rights abuses, mostly against blacks, such as detaining them indefinitely without trial, extra-judicial killings, torture and denying the black majority decent wages, decent housing, the right to vote and restricting their free movement, among other gross violations.

Read more...

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